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Future Of Farming—Indoors And In The City

CHICAGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Vertical farming is a growing trend. It’s a system that lets farmers produce crops and livestock indoors. Proponents say they’re saving buildings, creating jobs and helping the environment.

Carla McGarrah grew up on a farm. But the one she manages now is much different. In aquaponic farm crops grow in water, not dirt. Fish replace cattle and instead of outside, it’s in an abandoned meat packing plant in the center of Chicago.

“I live in a neighborhood like this one that doesn’t have very good access to local produce we have tons of vacant land and underused buildings or empty buildings,” Carla McGarrah told Ivanhoe.

John Edel bought the building to build a vertical farm. Most produce has to travel to get to grocery stores– an average of 1,500 miles – and produce loses many nutrients and flavor during the trip. Vertical farms reduce the distance and time, which means healthier food, less pollution in the air, and less wasting of our natural resources. Aquaponics is a combination of aqua culture (growing fish in tanks) with hydroponics (growing plants in water). The crops get nutrients from fish waste and the water continuously circulates providing oxygen to the tilapia and plants.

“The mantra here at the plant is nothing leaves but food no waste leaves the facility only food leaves,” John Edel, the Owner and developer of The Plant Chicago told Ivanhoe.

Edel says he got a grant to take the farm off the grid, which will save on energy costs.

“The digester will make bio gas which will be burnt in a turbine. In our case it’s a recycled military fighter jet engine that’s being remanufactured and repurposed that will power the facility,” Edel said.

They say they have the system under control and the ability to monitor it remotely. Edel says he wants to sell the fish as food too – which would be a first.

“We’re pushing boundaries in a lot of ways here,” Edel concluded.

Which makes rolling in to work everyday a new adventure for this urban farm girl.

If you think this sounds a bit far-fetched or crazy, you may want to think again. Bloomberg Business Week just named vertical farming one of the top 20 businesses of the future!

Click here to Go Inside This Science and View Video or contact:

John Edel
Developer
The Plant
info@plantchicago.com


This Month's TV Reports
Future Of Farming—Indoors And In The City

Vertical farms are a growing trend that’s turning old abandoned buildings into urban farms. We’ll take you inside and show you the new farm that’s producing crops and livestock indoors.

 

People Power: Turning Body Heat Into Energy

Move over coal, oil, solar, electric and natural gas … it’s time for some people power! Take your viewers inside the first building in the world to use the heat generated by people to power the building next door.

 

Saving Children: Surgery Corrects Spina Bifida Before Birth

Spina Bifida is one of the most common birth defects of the central nervous system. Now doctors are performing surgery even before birth to help these babies grow up to be active adults.

 

Growing Legs With ISKD

Imagine living life a little off balance—literally! Thousands of people have one leg longer than the other. A new device is helping to lengthen legs and get these people moving again.

 

Pay Attention! What Are You Doing While Driving?

Eighty-percent of all car crashes involve some form of distracted driving … but it’s not just cell phones that are to blame.

 

Tracking Oil Spills & Preventing Future Disasters

We are still cleaning up from the worst oil spill in U.S. history. Now, scientists have developed a new way to predict where oil will spread before a disaster happens.

 

Radioactive Water: Tea Bags To The Rescue?

It’s been months since the deadly earthquake rocked Japan, creating a nuclear disaster. It could be decades before all the radioactive waste is cleaned up. We’ll show you how tea bags with a twist could help.

 

Stroke—Is Your Family To Blame?

We all know our everyday habits can increase our risk of a stroke … but what role does our DNA play? Doctors around the world are working together to find out.

 

Listen Up! Hearing Loss Causes Dementia?

Two-thirds of all older Americans suffer from hearing loss. But hearing loss could lead to more than just lost words…it could lead to lost minds.

 

Treating Tremors With An Ultrasound

Millions of people suffer from tremors. A breakthrough procedure could stop the shaking without going under the knife.

 

World’s Smallest Microscope Focuses In On Cancer

New technology is giving surgeons the ability to not only detect cancer earlier, but also immediately treat it.

 

Super Soaker: Life-Saving Gauze

A police officer is shot in the line of duty nine times and you won’t believe what helped to save his life! What worked for him could save millions of other lives from the street to the combat zone.

 

Prior Reports
A joint production of Ivanhoe Broadcast News and the American Institute of Physics.
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