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TV REPORTS - Neuroscience
  

Dogs Detecting Seizures Before They Strike

WASHINGTON D.C (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It can happen at any time, any where, each year. Millions of Americans suffer seizures – caused when signals in the brain misfire. But now, new technology and man’s best friend may stop them before they start.

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Dogs Detecting Seizures Before They Strike

Pacman Eating Away Brain Tumors

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) --This year, 190,000 Americans will be diagnosed with a brain tumor. Many others will be told they have something that can be just as frightening—a fluid filled mass called a cyst, growing in their brain. Now, something that looks like Pacman is eating the problem away.

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Pacman Eating Away Brain Tumors

Stroke - Is Your Family To Blame?

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --It’s a well known fact that your everyday habits can affect your chances of having a stroke. Now, doctors want to learn more about what role our DNA plays. We have more on the international effort to identify genetic risk factors for stroke.

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Stroke - Is Your Family To Blame?

Listen up! Hearing Loss Causes Dementia

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Two-thirds of older Americans suffer from hearing loss. It can be a part of aging, but hearing loss could lead to more than just lost words. If you’re hard of hearing, listen up!

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Listen up! Hearing Loss Causes Dementia

Treating Tremors With An Ultrasound

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Millions of Americans suffer from tremors. Patients with constant shaking can have trouble with some of life’s everyday activities. Things like eating and drinking or holding a pen to write, are almost impossible. Now, learn about a breakthrough procedure that could help some patients get a steady hand.

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Treating Tremors With An Ultrasound

Hearing Loss—Your Race May Be To Blame

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Hearing loss affects nearly two-thirds of older Americans. But there’s one group of seniors that are less likely to have hearing problems. We’ll tell you who’s at risk and why.

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Hearing Loss—Your Race May Be To Blame

Parkinson’s: Do Race Or Income Matter?

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Parkinson’s disease affects a million Americans and 10 million people around the world. But new research indicates how an individual fares with Parkinson’s is related to how they live.

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Parkinson’s: Do Race Or Income Matter?

Wide Awake And Under The Knife

SAN DIEGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Imagine being told you have a brain tumor. Now imagine doctors telling you they want to remove it while you're awake. We found out talking to patients during surgery may be the key to success.

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Wide Awake And Under The Knife

Improving Memory One Step At A Time

CHAMPAIGN, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire)--It's no secret that living a couch potato lifestyle-tied--to your television or computer is not good for your health. New research now shows that a simple walk in the park not only improves your waistline, but could give your brain a boost.

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Improving Memory One Step At A Time

Helping To Hear: Cochlear Implants x 2

MADISON, WI (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Since the invention of cochlear implants, a breakthrough device that helps the deaf hear, thousands of patients are now part of the hearing world. For years, deaf children were only offered one implant, despite being deaf in both ears.

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Helping To Hear: Cochlear Implants x 2

Two Blindness Breakthroughs

Every five seconds, someone in the world goes blind. Six million people in the United States are losing or have lost their sight to eye disease. By 2020, that number is expected to double. But researchers may be on the trail to a cure for blindness

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Two Blindness Breakthroughs

Getting Kids to Eat Their Veggies

For many parents, getting kids to eat their vegetables is a battle. It often requires patience, persistence, and maybe a little pleading on the side. Researchers say the reason some kids have a tougher time than others may be in their genes.

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Getting Kids to Eat Their Veggies

Cell Phone Warning: Walking & Talking Don't Mix!

URBANA, Il. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We all know the dangers of using a cell phone while driving. Studies show it's equivalent to being drunk behind the wheel. Now, there's a new danger: walking and using a cell phone. Twice the number of pedestrians were treated in 2008 in the ER for tripping and falling while using cell phones than in 2007. Experts warn of the dangers of walking and talking.

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Cell Phone Warning: Walking & Talking Don't Mix!

Fishy Cure for Hearing Loss: Medicine’s Next Big Thing?

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Thirty million people in the U.S. suffer significant hearing problems. Another 2 million are profoundly deaf. Now, scientists are working with a tiny tropical zebra fish to find some unusual answers that could help people hear again.

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Fishy Cure for Hearing Loss: Medicine’s Next Big Thing?

Bionic Hands

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fr most of us, losing a limb would be devastating, but imagine losing both arms and both legs. Meet a woman who is not only surviving, but thriving, using the latest in prosthetic technology. A new bionic hand is helping amputee's regain control and independence.

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Bionic Hands

Video Games: Good For You?!?

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Video games are a part of growing up for most kids in the U.S. In a recent survey, 97 percent of children age 12 to 17 said they play video games, whether it's on their computer or on an Xbox, PlayStation or other device. Now, a new study says certain kinds of video games can actually improve the way we see the world around us.

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Video Games: Good For You?!?

Giving Parkinson's Patients A Voice

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Parkinson's disease affects 1.5 million people in the United States. About 90 percent of them have problems with speaking loud enough to be heard. Now a new technology that's helping Parkinson's patients speak up.

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Giving Parkinson's Patients A Voice

Whistling Orangutan

WASHINGTON D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Many of us learned to whistle as a kid. It's a talent thought only humans could master … until now.

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Whistling Orangutan

Zapping Disease with Electricity

CLEVELAND, OH (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are medications for almost everything, but for conditions that start in the brain, the side effects can be near-disabling, and benefits often diminish with time. Electricity is changing the way doctors treat neurological conditions like Parkinson's, chronic headaches, back pain and epilepsy. The newest way to treat disease can't be found in a pill bottle.

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Zapping Disease with Electricity

Air Conditioning for Football Players

Gainesville, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Football season is here! Those bulky uniforms are designed to protect athletes, but they also make football players vulnerable to dangerous overheating. Football deaths from heat stroke are on the rise. Since 2001, 18 young men have died on the field, and researchers have taken notice. They've combined science and a simple set of shoulder pads to protect players from the heat.

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Air Conditioning for Football Players

Hot Helmet For Football Players

TYRONE, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It's football season and for players, that means long, exhausting practices, lots of contact, and sometimes injuries. But not all those injuries will happen because of a tackle or a hit. Since 1995, 39 football players -- mostly high schoolers -- have died from overheating. Hundreds more have suffered serious medical problems. Now, a new kind of football helmet could help players stay safe.

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Hot Helmet For Football Players

Truth is Written on Your Face

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You can't hide from the truth … or can you? Is it possible to cover up your emotions, or will your body get the best of you? The truth is written all over your face.

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Truth is Written on Your Face

Is Your Dog Deaf?

BATON ROUGE, La. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- How's your dog's hearing? You may not realize it, but congenital deafness shows up in dog breeds from Dalmatians to Jack Russell's. Your dog can't tell you he's hard of hearing, but now, science may have found a better way to detect canine hearing problems.

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Is Your Dog Deaf?

Pain Relief for Pets

MADISON, Wisc. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- For many pet owners, it's tough to leave your best friend behind at the animal hospital. Scientists are working on a new formula that could make their experience less painful and get them home to you sooner.

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Pain Relief for Pets

Google Your Way to Mental Fitness

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Scientists can now see signs of aging in the brain before we even begin to feel the effects. The latest research shows we may be able to slow down the process. It may be possible to Google your way to mental fitness.

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Google Your Way to Mental Fitness

Autism: Diagnosing Brothers And Sisters

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every 20 minutes a child is diagnosed with autism. It's the fastest growing developmental disability in children. There is no cure and diagnosis can be difficult. Now researchers are looking at ways to find autism in infants because the sooner doctors diagnose it, the sooner children can be helped.

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Autism: Diagnosing Brothers And Sister

Diagnosis: Brain Injury

DALLAS (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- One person dies in a car crash in the U.S. every 13 minutes. If you're one of the lucky one's, you survive; but just because a victim's head isn't bleeding doesn't mean they are perfectly fine. In fact, two million people will suffer from a brain injury this year and many may not even realize it. Diagnosis can be difficult, but doctors are using a new twist to an old scan to help doctors better understand what's happening inside your brain.

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Diagnosis: Brain Injury

Fountain of Youth for Your Brain

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You walk into a room and can't remember why. Sound familiar? Research shows that once we turn 25, our brains slow production of chemicals linked to memory. Now, a new supplement can help keep your memory sharp!

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Fountain of Youth for Your Brain

Silence the Ringing in Your Ears

DETROIT (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fifty million people live every day with ringing in their ears. It's called tinnitus, and there is no cure. A new treatment could silence the ringing and give thousands of sufferers relief.

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Silence the Ringing in Your Ears

Retrain Your Brain After Stroke

NEWARK, Del. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Stroke patients often have to overcome a number of challenges before they can get back on their feet. Physical therapists are using a new tool to help patients not only retrain their bodies but also rewire their brains.

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Retrain Your Brain After Stroke

Learn to Read Through Sound

BOSTON (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Dyslexia can be a frustrating condition, making it difficult for children to read. Many think it is a visual issue, but a new study using a computer game reveals the problem may not only be with sight, but also sound.

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Learn to Read Through Sound

Men are From Mars

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are many books and movies that highlight the psychological differences between men and women -- Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus, for example; but now, neurologists say they have brain images that prove male and female brains do work differently -- at least under stress.

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Men are From Mars

Lost & Found

IRVINE, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Are you always losing things? Your purse? The remote? You're not alone. But now, scientists may have found the key to finding your lost keys … and more!

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Lost & Found

Surgery Without Anesthesia

Baltimore, M.D. -- As the heated debate over immigration rages on, the tale of an illegal migrant worker turned brain surgeon shows a positive side to immigration.

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Surgery Without Anesthesia

From Immigrant to Brain Surgeon

Baltimore, M.D. -- As the heated debate over immigration rages on, the tale of an illegal migrant worker turned brain surgeon shows a positive side to immigration.

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From Immigrant to Brain Surgeon

Helping Patients Walk Again

Hamburg, Penn. -- For stroke patients or people living with multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy, one of the most difficult, but very common, side effects of their condition is paralysis of part of the body. But now, a new device is giving some patients their life back.

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Helping Patients Walk Again

GPS for the Brain

Chicago, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Surgery is getting better and better and the tools used are getting smaller and smaller. What used to require large incisions and months of recovery is now done with tiny instruments. The latest 3-D technology makes brain surgery better and safer for patients suffering from a stroke or aneurysm.

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GPS for the Brain

Unraveling Brain Tumors

Memphis, Tenn. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Brain tumors are often deadly. Figuring out a way to wipe them out has been a mystery for scientists. But now, a new discovery may offer clues and hope for those with even the most hard-to-treat tumors.

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Unraveling Brain Tumors

Helping the Deaf Hear

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Hearing with your bones? It may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but a new device is allowing some partially deaf patients to do just that.

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Helping the Deaf Hear

iPOD: How Loud is too Loud?

Turn down the volume! Your iPOD could be drowning your hearing. We'll find out what's safe and what's putting your hearing at risk.

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iPOD: How Loud is too Loud?

Pinpointing Problems in the Brain

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Dawn Helton has tried just about everything available to stop her seizures so she can get back to living her life. "I mostly, um, just lose my hearing and my speech ... confusion. Then, of course, I'm really tired and stuff," she says.

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Pinpointing Problems in the Brain

What Color is A?

WATERLOO, Ontario (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- What does yellow taste like? What color is the letter M? Not usual questions you hear, but some people's senses are actually joined together. It's called synesthesia. For years, synesthesia was dismissed as the product of someone's overactive imagination. But in the past decade, researchers have documented hundreds of cases of otherwise normal people ... Who have these extraordinary blended senses.

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What Color is A?

Tracking Your Team

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- From the quarterback to the tight end ... From passing ... tackling ... offense .... defense ... Sometimes it's tough for fans to keep up with all the action!

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Tracking Your Team

Are You Really Paying Attention

CINCINNATI (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Watching ... focusing ... scanning ... Millions of American jobs require intense concentration on monitors or television screens. But are we really paying attention?

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Are You Really Paying Attention

Even If You Don't Blink -- You'll Miss It!

Much of what we see doesn't grab our attention, but what about gory and erotic images? Do they capture your attention? No surprise if they do, and certain images like those are so attention-grabbing that we are literally blinded.

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Even If You Don't Blink -- You'll Miss It!

Better at Bat

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Why do some players hit it out of the park, when others can barely get it past the pitcher? Could it be that athletes playing well in a baseball game see the ball as a different size than it really is?

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Better at Bat

Why I Hate Anchovies

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Why do some people like these foods and others don't? Science may have many of the basics of the human body down, but our sense of taste and smell are still somewhat of a mystery.

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Why I Hate Anchovies

Learning to Walk Again

RICHMOND, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- For patients with some types of movement disorders, a deep brain stimulation procedure can be a godsend. Until now, surgeons had to use a big, bulky device to hold patients still. But a new invention is making the surgery much easier on doctors and patients.

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Learning to Walk Again

Stroke Stopper

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When a stroke hits, it hits the brain hard -- many times causing paralysis, speech problems, or even death. Now, doctors have a new weapon against this deadly brain attacker.

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Stroke Stopper

Spinal Cord Injuries: Back on Your   Feet

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Their injuries left them paralyzed, now, however, one doctor is giving new hope to patients suffering from spinal cord injuries.

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Spinal Cord Injuries: Back on Your Feet

Predicting Alzheimer's

NEW YORK CITY (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Alzheimer's is a devastating illness affecting 4 million Americans and their families. Would you want to know if Alzheimer's is in your future? Now, a new twist to a common and inexpensive test may tell relatives if they, too, will suffer from the mind-altering disease.

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Predicting Alzheimer's

Baby Talk

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Can the noise level inside your house actually make it harder for your baby to learn to talk? Researchers now say turning down the TV can actually help your child find their voice faster.

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Baby Talk

Breakthrough Brain Surgery

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Imagine checking into the hospital for brain surgery on a Wednesday and being home to enjoy your weekend with no scars or side effects. High-tech medicine is making that all possible, and the key to its success is as plain as the nose on your face.

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Breakthrough Brain Surgery

Cell Phone Risk

LAWRENCE, Kan. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Sealing a business deal, talking with your friends, making plans, checking messages ... Just how dangerous is driving and talking on a cell phone? New research that proves driving and dialing don't mix.

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Cell Phone Risk

Back Pain Relief

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Millions of Americans live with back and sciatica pain each day. Medication, therapy, even surgery doesn't help. Now one man's invention may ease the buttock and leg pain associated with sciatica and Piriformis Syndrome.

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Back Pain Relief

Inside the Brain

ST. LOUIS (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A baby has a stroke and can learn to talk. An adult suffers a stroke and may never be the same. What's the difference? Now researchers are developing more effective treatments for stroke patients by studying fMRI brain scans.

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Inside the Brain
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