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TV REPORTS - Earth Science
  

Snow-Wing Flights Make Flakes

BOULDER, CO (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- When it comes to flying, there are 23,000 scheduled take offs and landings each day in the U.S. Now some of those never make it off the ground due to bad weather—but what if we told you, some bad weather is caused by those planes? We’ll show you how the plane you are in could be causing a change in the local weather.

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Snow-Wing Flights Make Flakes

Hurricanes - Predicting the Strength Of The Storm

CHAMPAIGN, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The hurricane season ends November 30th. If you think we are out of the path of the storm right now—think again. There have been 86 tropical storms in November, 57 named hurricanes, and five of them have hit the U.S. Meteorologists are good at forecasting the potential path, but forecasting the strength still needs work. Now, we’ll tell you how new technology can help predict how strong a storm will become.

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Hurricanes - Predicting The Strength Of The Storm

‘Grass O'line’: The Fuel Of The Future?

BOULDER, CO. (Ivanhoe Newswire)--Scientists are studying all kinds of ways to create new sources of energy. Now, the U.S Department of Agriculture and Department of Energy have granted researchers more than 10 million dollars to study bioenergy crops, one of those could be grass-o-line.

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‘Grass O'line’: The Fuel Of The Future?

Saving Our Seas - Cleaning Up Our Oceans

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Each year millions of gallons of pollutants end up in our oceans, including engine oil from cars, sewage, chemical spill runoff from industrial plants, and oil spills. Now, we’ll tell you about a new technology that can help spot and track dangerous contaminants in the oceans faster than any other current method.

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Saving Our Seas - Cleaning Up Our Oceans

Tracking Oil Spills & Preventing Future Disasters

RALEIGH, N.C (Ivanhoe Newswire) --It was a little over a year ago that BP’s deepwater horizon oil rig exploded, sending millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, the worst oil spill in U.S history. From oil-covered birds to the spreading oil slick on the water, it was an environmental disaster like we’ve never seen before. Now, scientists and mathematicians have developed a new predictive tool that could track the spread of oil spills even before they happen.

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Tracking Oil Spills & Preventing Future Disasters

S.O.S! Surviving the Big Quake

SAN DIEGO (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Billions of dollars in damage, and thousands of lives lost. While Japan continues to recover from March’s devastating earthquake, one researcher here in the states is using innovative ways to help minimize the destruction those disasters can cause. We found out how he’s making his own quakes, at his desk.

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S.O.S! Surviving the Big Quake

Project Bud Burst

DENVER (Ivanhoe Newswire) --If the possibility of climate change has you concerned, you can help do research even if you are not a scientist. In fact, thousands of citizen-scientists are contributing just by watching their own backyard.

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Project Bud Burst

Earthquakes: Saving Buildings - Saving Lives

PALO ALTO, CA (Ivanhoe Newswire) --More than 100 dead, and several hundred more injured. That was the scene last month in New Zealand after a quake rocked the country. For days, a 27 floor building was in jeopardy of collapsing. But what if buildings could be created that were quake-proof? Science is stepping in, and constructing buildings that move with the quake and can survive some of the strongest natural disasters.

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Earthquakes: Saving Buildings - Saving Lives

Vacuuming Up Oil Spills

CHAMPAIGN, IL (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There’s no forgetting the BP deepwater horizon explosion that caused the largest oil spill in U.S. history into the Gulf of Mexico. But it wasn’t the first oil spill to happen, and experts say it won’t be the last.

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Vacuuming Up Oil Spills

Talking To Animals

SANTA CRUZ, CA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- 71 percent of the earths' surface is covered by the sea. Water provides 99-pecent of the earths living space. Did you know that the animals and fish living in it are in jeopardy? Now, a couple of dolphins, some sea otters and a monk seal are helping researchers save our seas and the billion of lives in it.

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Talking To Animals

Ocean Energy: Powering Our Future

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- By the year 2020, demand for energy in the U.S. is expected to grow by 32 percent. We depend on fossil fuels for 85 percent of our nation’s energy supply, so it’s no wonder we’re looking for alternative sources of renewable energy. You’ve heard about solar power and wind power, now, a team of scientists is looking at generating electricity from a really big source, the Atlantic Ocean.

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Ocean Energy: Powering Our Future

Girls Changing Science

COLLEGE PARK, MD (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Think of a stereotypical scientist and the first thing that comes to mind is an old man with fuzzy white hair and a lab coat. But what if I told you that's all wrong and that age is just a number in the world of science?

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Girls Changing Science

Geology Rocks!

PHILADELPHIA, PA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- What do you know about tsunamis, earthquakes, landslides or even beach erosion? And why do these events matter to all of us? A Penn State Geologist is answering that question by showing how geology "rocks."

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Geology Rocks!

Surviving a Tsunami

CORVALLIS, OR (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you thought tsunamis only affected people living near them, you might be surprised to know that 50 percent of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of the coast. That means a tsunami could impact your life far more than you ever imagined.

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Surviving a Tsunami

More Volcanoes - Less Storms

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- So far this year we’ve had 62 volcanic eruptions around the world and we are up to 14-named tropical storms and hurricanes. Does one affect the other? How can a hot volcano affect a rainy, windy hurricane?

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More Volcanoes - Less Storms

Clean Streams = Healthy People

MORGANTOWN, WV (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Local fresh water streams can provide fun activities like fishing. Streams are also an important part of the environment, supporting marine life and providing many homes with water, but streams can get “sick” with pollutants affecting nearby communities. How can your stream’s health and your health be linked?

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Clean Streams = Healthy People

Submerged In Oil

Monterey, CA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The massive leak in the gulf is sealed shut, now the focus is on the oil left behind. How much is there left to clean up? That’s the question. Science is helping to figure out just how much is left behind and how dangerous it is.

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Submerged In Oil

New Spin On Tornadoes

ATLANTA, GA (Ivanhoe newswire) -- Even before the devastation of hurricane Katrina, climatologists say since the 1990s, gulf hurricanes have been getting bigger and more powerful. We know that puts coastal residents at risk, but it can also increase the threat of devastating tornadoes hundreds of miles from where gulf hurricanes come ashore.

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New Spin On Tornadoes

Digging For Earthquakes

MADISON, WI (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Earthquakes happen around the world every day. There’s a lot known about earthquakes, but scientists still have unanswered questions, especially about quake zones lying underwater that could cause devastating tsunamis.

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Digging For Earthquakes

Global Warming & the Feedback Effect

COLLEGE STATION, TX (Ivanhoe News) -- With temperatures soaring this summer, global warming is on many people's minds. This June was the hottest on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). But while most know about the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, have you heard about what it does to the humidity?

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Global Warming & the Feedback Effect

Oil's Impact on Your Health

BERKELEY, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The United States consumes 20 million barrels of oil every day. That's 2.5 gallons of oil per person per day. We use it in everything from our cars to making water bottles. We’ve seen the devastation our dependence to oil has had in the gulf -- birds, fish, and wildlife. But what is the impact of all of that oil on all of us?

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Oil's Impact on Your Health

Tree Power!

GAITHERSBURG, MD (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The average home spends about $1900 a year on energy costs. But you can lower your energy bills and help save the environment at the same time. Here is a simple way to help keep your home cool this summer.

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Tree Power!

Killing Our Oceans

MOSS LANDING, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Seventy-one percent of the earth's surface is covered with water. Fifty percent of all of life on earth is found in the ocean. But their home may be in danger. Dead zones are appearing and spreading around the globe.

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Killing Our Oceans

Hurricanes and A New El Niño: Modoki

ATLANTA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Hurricane season is coming, and that means you'll also be hearing about the weather phenomenon El Niño. Traditionally, during years with the changing weather patters, there are fewer Atlantic hurricanes. But now, scientists say there is a new kind of El Niño that may bring more hurricanes, but also provide an earlier warning.

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Hurricanes and A New El Niño: Modoki

Tornados Safety: Predicting Disasters

ATHENS, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Tornadoes are among the most dangerous and most devastating natural disasters. More than 1,100 tornadoes were reported last year. Like hurricanes, knowing early how severe the season will be helps meteorologists and the public prepare before it even begins.

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Tornados Safety: Predicting Disasters

Tornado Warnings! 15 Minutes Saves Your Life

SHERMAN, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We're heading into tornado season. On average, there are about 1,000 twisters spotted each year. Last year, nine killer tornados claimed 21 lives. The hardest hit state was Oklahoma. New studies show there is a key life saving time for you to hear a storm warning and take cover. Just a few minutes can make a difference.

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Tornado Warnings! 15 Minutes Saves Your Life

Garden Greener

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- As we wait out the cold of winter, dreaming for the sunny skies of spring, take a break and start planning your garden. I know it may be hard to fathom now, but in many regions of the country, 2010 may not bring any relief from withering drought conditions. In places like California, emergency plans are already in place for an anticipated five-year drought. With so many people looking for ways to conserve, experts say it may be time to rethink your backyard, no matter where you live.

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Garden Greener

Detecting Toxins in the Sea

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Mussels, oysters, crab legs … they're some of the finest from the sea, but they can be deadly. A toxic shellfish kill the fish that eat them and can make people sick … even paralyzed.

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Detecting Toxins in the Sea

Tracking Tsunamis

BOULDER (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We are coming up on the fifth anniversary of a horrific disaster that killed a quarter of a million people in a matter of minutes. It was this month, five years ago a tsunami raced toward the peaceful, panoramic tourist beaches in the Indian Ocean. There was no time for warning, but since then, scientists are making progress on a new type of tsunami detection system.

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Tracking Tsunamis

Inside the Wind

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Traditionally, wind tunnels are used to study the effects of hurricane-force winds on objects like cars, houses or airplanes. But now researchers are looking at how much wind a person can withstand.

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Inside the Wind

New and Improved Wind Power

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Wind power is the fastest growing renewable energy source in the United States. Last year, 42 percent of all new electricity was generated by it. But to get the most power from wind, wind farms need to be efficient and reliable. A new smart sensor is helping improve this clean and renewable energy technology.

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New and Improved Wind Power

Using the Wind to Save Money

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Wind is a clean and cost-effective renewable energy. Still, the U.S. relies on it for only 1 percent of its energy. Now, one of the nation's largest energy providers is challenging scientists to come up with a way to reliably predict wind so it can be used to make more electricity.

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Using the Wind to Save Money

Growing in Tunnels

ITHICA, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fall is here and that means the end of the growing season for farmers in many parts of the country. If you like the taste of fresh tomatoes or strawberries, those hothouse varieties they sell at the supermarket in the winter aren't much of a substitute. But now scientists are finding ways to keep farmers growing longer -- long after the field harvest time has passed.

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Growing in Tunnels

Cleaning Up Toxic Playgrounds

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- When we hear stories of lead poisoning in kids, many times we blame paint and imported toys; but chronic lead poisoning from playing in contaminated dirt is affecting U.S. children in epidemic proportions.

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Cleaning Up Toxic Playgrounds

Exclusive! First Look at the Bottom of the Sea

WOODS HOLE, Mass. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The deepest part of the world's oceans extends farther below sea level than Mount Everest reaches into the sky. Now a new robotic vehicle is taking researchers further down into the depths of the deep blue sea than ever before.

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Exclusive! First Look at the Bottom of the Sea

Beware of Flash Floods

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Flooding is one of the deadliest types of natural disasters humans face. Why? Most people underestimate the power of nature. Many drivers are willing to risk their lives on flooded roads, but now the government is trying to put a stop to that by getting the message across to "Turn around. Don't drown."

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Beware of Flash Floods

Which Days Will Storms Strike?

GREENBELT, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Worried about planning a weekend getaway, picnic or party, only to have it get rained out? Scientists can now tell you which days of the week are the best party-planning days.

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Which Days Will Storms Strike?

Giant Squid - Behind the Scenes

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The giant squid lives deep in the ocean. Scientists want to learn more about these elusive creatures, but few have been seen or caught. Science is helping preserve the rare deep sea creature forever.

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Giant Squid - Behind the Scenes

Science of Surfing

LA JOLLA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Just a few more weeks to enjoy the warm weather … and some schools are taking advantage of their students' love for the beach -- to give them a little lesson in physics. Some students are getting more than they bargained for.

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Science of Surfing

Predicting Flash Floods

BOULDER, Co. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- People living near vulnerable rivers and creeks may soon be able to get advance notice of potentially dangerous flash floods.

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Predicting Flash Floods

Flying & Radiation Risk

Hampton, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Some careers have occupational hazards, but airline crews and frequent fliers may be exposed to hidden flight risks and not even know it.

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Flying & Radiation Risk

Solving the Mystery Of Mars

TUCSON, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It has mountains, canals and deserts, yet we know that Mars is as much unlike our earth as it is similar.

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Solving the Mystery Of Mars

Save the Environment: Save Money

DAVIS, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We've all heard about the effects of global warming, but do you know your carbon footprint? How much does your car contribute? Your house? Your office? Most people contribute 20 tons of carbon dioxide each year.

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Save the Environment: Save Money

Tracking Down Extinct Animals

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- There are at least 8 million species of life here on Earth, but by 2050, that number will be down to 7 million. That means 1 million mammals, primates, fish and plants will become extinct! Who's to blame? What's the cause? Scientists recently ventured deep into the forest to find a long-lost primate -- one of the few animals that has come back from extinction.

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Tracking Down Extinct Animals

Global Warming Impacting Our Oceans

MOSS LANDING, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Global warming … it's happening as we speak. The last two decades have been the warmest in 400 years. In the past 20 year, the temperature in Alaska has risen at twice the global average. One of the biggest impacts is being seen underwater.

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Global Warming Impacting Our Oceans

Is Air Pollution Killing You?

BATON ROUGE, La. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We all know that cigarette smoking is hazardous to our health, causing lung cancer and a variety of other illnesses. But could we be inhaling something equally dangerous every day without even knowing it? New research is looking at health hazards found in air pollution.

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Is Air Pollution Killing You?

Global Warming Causes Kidney Stones

DALLAS (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Kidney stones are one of the most painful urological disorders. They're also one of the most common. One in 10 people will experience the pain of passing a kidney stone at some point in their lives. New research says where you live may put you at higher risk for developing them.

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Global Warming Causes Kidney Stones

Dig It! The Secrets of Soil

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It’s a science destination with a dirty little secret! A unique exhibit is aimed to change the way you think about what's beneath your feet.

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Dig It! The Secrets of Soil

Global Hotspots: Which States Are Heating Up?

WEST LAFAYETTE, In. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The earth's climate is expected to continue warming for years to come. Now, a new study suggests certain areas of the country may see more climate changes than others. Which areas will feel the most heat?

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Global Hotspots: Which States Are Heating Up?

1,000 Carat Diamond

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Man-made diamonds are big business. More and more are popping up in jewelry stores nationwide, but even lab-grown diamonds have their flaws. Thanks to new technology, some man-made gems that may be better than earth-mined ones.

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1,000 Carat Diamond

What Causes Quakes?

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It's likely an earthquake is hitting somewhere in the world right now. There are 500,000 detectable earthquakes in the world each year, and don't think you're not at risk. Between 1975 and 1995, all states except four experienced an earthquake. They're not easy to predict. When, where and how strong they'll be are all mysteries. Now, scientists are digging deep to find the answer.

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What Causes Quakes?

Thirsty Plants Text for Help

NEW YORK (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- House plants look good, brighten a room, produce oxygen, purify indoor air, eliminate noxious gases and reduce carbon monoxide levels. So why do so many of us forget to water them? Now, there may be a solution to solve that problem. Thirsty plants can now let you know they need water.

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Thirst Plants Text for Help

Global Warming Causes Severe Storms

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- As new storm forecasts hit home, areas already prone to severe weather need to be on the lookout for more storms. The latest forecast says global warming spells bad news for those areas.

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Global Warming Causes Severe Storms

Big Quakes Trigger Smaller Quakes

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- An earthquake in Alaska could trigger one near you, even if you're not in an earthquake-prone area, new research shows. Seismologists are now finding earthquakes in some unexpected places.

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Big Quakes Trigger Smaller Quakes

Tracking CO2

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The Environmental Protection Agency estimates emissions in the United States rose almost 15 percent between 1990 and 2006, and the number will continue to rise. Carbon dioxide is mainly responsible for the increase. A new high-tech map reveals the areas in the country most responsible for the carbon dioxide problem.

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Tracking CO2

Tracking Pollution From Space

TEMPE, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every day, we count on information from satellites to guide the GPS in our cars, track approaching hurricanes, or just tell us what the weather will be like tomorrow -- but could satellite data also help protect us from pollution that could be hazardous to our health? That's what researchers are trying to find out.

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Tracking Pollution From Space

Predicting When Tornadoes Will Strike

NORMAN, Okla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- This year has been one of the most active tornado seasons of the last 50 years. In the first half of the year alone, 118 people were killed by a tornado touchdown. The unpredictability of tornadoes is worsening as they strike in places once considered unusual. In August, a tornado warning was even issued in New York City -- and touchdowns like these are keeping meteorologists busy.

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Predicting When Tornadoes Will Strike

Slower-Growing Grass

BELLE GLADE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every weekend, about 54 million Americans mow their lawns -- using 800 million gallons of fuel each year. Research shows a standard gas-powered lawn mower produces as much air pollution as 43 new cars each being driven 12 thousand miles. That's a lot of gas, never mind the sweat and hard work! To address this problem, experts have developed a new type of grass that's cutting mowing needs in half -- and promising to make your neighbors green with envy.

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Slower-Growing Grass

Year 'Round Bloom

RIVERHEAD, N.Y. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fall is here -- and that means the beautiful colors of summer will soon start to fade away. One man is trying to extend summer -- or at least one part of it -- by creating a flower that blooms all summer long.

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Year 'Round Bloom

Man-Made Hurricanes

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More hurricanes strike the U.S. in September than in any other month of the year. The best-built houses are more likely to survive these severe storms. Now, there’s a new way to test how homes hold up -- and it’s just like being in the eye of the storm.

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Man-Made Hurricanes

Thunderstorms Cause Asthma

ATLANTA, Ga. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Twenty million Americans suffer from asthma, a disease that can be uncomfortable -- even life threatening -- and can interfere with the simplest of life’s routines. For patients with asthma, staying attack-free often depends on knowing what triggers their attacks. Now, research shows something as simple as the weather may be a bigger factor than we ever imagined.

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Thunderstorms Cause Asthma

Pollution Killing Flowers' Fragrance

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Soon, it may be harder to stop and smell the roses. Something is killing off flower’s sweet smell. Now, we can discover what the culprit is.

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Pollution Killing Flowers' Fragrance

Tracking Tornado Damage From Space

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- This year, dozens of communities around the U.S. are recovering from devastating tornadoes -- storms that have caused millions of dollars worth of damage to homes, businesses and crops. After every reported tornado, it’s the job of the weather service to track its path, and estimate the damage, but since tornadoes can travel hundreds of miles and touch down multiple times, that’s not always easy. Now, there may be a solution -- from space!

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Tracking Tornado Damage From Space

Knowing Where Tornadoes Will Strike

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It has been a devastating and deadly year for tornadoes in the United States. With more than 100 confirmed fatalities, 2008 is said to be the deadliest year for tornadoes since 1998. Now, science may be riding the wave of a new tornado forecasting tool that could help save lives.

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Knowing Where Tornadoes Will Strike

More Accurate Hurricane Predictions

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The 2008 hurricane season is underway. Will it be an active season, or a quiet one? Scientists are looking at a new atmospheric model that could hold some of the answers, and one day allow them to predict hurricane activity months in advance, providing an earlier warning for those in harm’s way.

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More Accurate Hurricane Predictions

Growing Greener Lawns

GREEN BAY, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every summer, wildfires consume thousands of acres of vegetation, threaten wildlife and set the stage for mudslides that can wreak even more havoc. Now, scientists have developed a new kind of soil technology that could stabilize those areas and help them grow again. And now, there could be an added bonus for anyone trying to keep their lawn greener this summer.

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Growing Greener Lawns

Using the Weather to Go Green

SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you're looking for ways to bring your energy costs down you may want to take a look outside. The weather can save you big money if you learn how to work with it.

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Using the Weather to Go Green

Overseas Pollution Hitting the U.S.

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every summer, a combination of heat, car exhaust and other chemicals cooks up into a big pollution problem called ozone. Forty-five percent of the U.S. population now lives in areas that exceed the health standard limit for ozone. But now, researchers have made an important discovery -- some of that air pollution is actually coming from the other side of the ocean.

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Overseas Pollution Hitting the U.S.

Saving Marshes -- Saving the Planet

BALTIMORE, Md. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Our nations wetlands are disappearing at an alarming rate. But now, marshes are being restored to help save the planet.

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Saving Marshes -- Saving the Planet

Volcano Warning!

MENLO PARK, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Millions of people in the United States live every day with the threat of a volcano close by. If it erupts, it could be disastrous -- not only for the people on the ground, but also for the planes flying above. But a new website could help warn them both if disaster strikes.

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Volcano Warning!

Your Five-Day Forecast: More Than Ever Before!

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Odds are you have already watched one weather forecast today and will probably check out a few more. Accurate, timely forecasts are vital to everyday life, but just how critical may surprise you.

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Your Five-Day Forecast: More Than Ever Before!

Saving Lives When Wildifres Burn

UNIVERSITY PARK, Penn. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Most of us like to access the daily forecast so we know how to dress for work, school or travel. But for those who rely on the weather for their livelihoods, like emergency responders, researchers have developed a way to deliver updated and customized weather maps directly to their desktops.

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Saving Lives When Wildifres Burn

Spring Flowers: Clues to Climate Change

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Could the emergence of spring provide clues to climate change? Some researchers think so and now, you can be part of the scientific process studying global warming, just by observing what's blooming in your own backyard.

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Spring Flowers: Clues to Climate Change

Perfect Weather Predictions

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every day, weather forecasters are put to the test for accurate daily predictions. It's a hard job that gets blamed for rained-out picnics, cancelled barbecues and delayed planes; but today, our forecasts are more accurate than any other time in history.

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Perfect Weather Predictions

Dust Storms: Early Warning

TUCZON, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Every year, early warnings about dangerous thunderstorms -- even tornadoes and hurricanes -- help get millions of people out of harms way before the danger comes. Now, scientists are worried about a new threat: dust storms. If you think only desert dwellers need to worry, think again.

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Dust Storms: Early Warning

Inside the Clouds

FORT COLLINS, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- NASA satellites are lifting the cloud of uncertainty surrounding climate change. Five satellites, flying in formation above the Earth, are revealing several times more information about global warming than traditional research methods.

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Inside the Clouds

Global Warming = Strong Hurricanes

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- According to new research, hurricanes in the North Atlantic are stronger and larger than ever before. Scientists now say they know what's to blame.

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Global Warming = Strong Hurricanes

Saving Seahorses

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- They're mesmerizing to watch, but seahorses may go the way of dinosaurs. One researcher concerned about their depletion is studying ways to help them survive.

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Saving Seahorses

Chickens on a Diet

NEWARK, Del. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Millions of chickens, like many Americans, are starting a new diet regimen, but instead of helping to lose weight, the diet helps the environment.

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Chickens on a Diet

The World on Water

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Yu may know how mountains formed, but do you know why they stay high up in the sky?

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The World on Water

Protecting Miners

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Coal miners provide the raw material for nearly half of America's power. Every year, there are an estimated 14-hundred roof collapses and cave-ins at coal mines -- making it essential to provide supports that can keep escape routes open. Now, scientists are using a one-of- a-kind machine to improve safety.

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Protecting Miners

Iron Science Teacher

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Want to know if your science teacher is the best? Send them to San Francisco to compete for the iron science crown.

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Iron Science Teacher

Protecting Your Water

BERKLEY, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The same seismic waves picked up by a seismometer during an earthquake now has a new use -- finding problems at the source of your drinking water.

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Protecting Your Water

In-flight De-icer

DENVER, Co. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Of all the dangers weather can pose to an aircraft, ice is often considered the worst. For three decades, the National Transportation Safety Board has repeatedly called icing a threat to air safety. Now there's a new technology that could save travel time, money, and lives.

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In-flight De-icer

Tree Tracker for Cities

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Trees add beauty to cities and neighborhoods, plus they help the environment. But some areas are short on tree coverage, and many cities don’t have an accurate tree count. Now, there is a new way volunteers are helping cities track trees.

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Tree Tracker for Cities

Underwater Earthquakes

Woods Hole, Mass. -- In December 2004, an underwater earthquake triggered a string of tsunamis along the Indian Ocean with devastating effects. Now, scientists have found ways nature is preventing some deep ocean earthquakes and save lives. Strong underwater earthquakes start off silent -- until their tsunami waves roar on shore, destroying property and lives.

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Underwater Earthquakes

Storm Warnings: Right on Track

Washington D.C. -- It’s important to pay attention to warnings of severe weather in our area, but not everyone takes the alerts seriously. Next time severe weather hits, a new warning system could dramatically save lives and property.

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Storm Warnings: Right on Track

3-D Hurricane Tracking

Boulder, Colo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- 2004 … the strongest hurricane to hit the U.S. in more than a decade … killing ten people … causing thirteen-billion dollars in damage. Its arrival was expected. Its intensity … an absolute surprise.

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3-D Hurricane Tracking

Our Changing Climate

Madison, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The eastern United States has a mild, humid, temperate climate, while the western United States has a dry climate, right? Well, according to climate models, global warming could change our current world climate zones, which would affect where crops are grown and even drive some plant and animal species to extinction, all in the next 100 years.

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Our Changing Climate

Predicting Wildfires

Madison, Wisc. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- They burn, strip away and destroy everything in their path. More than 140,000 wildfires occur each year in this country, costing us billions. And the problem is getting worse. Now, scientists are figuring out where wildfires will happen before they happen.

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Predicting Wildfires

Dust Storms & Hurricanes

MADISON, Wis. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- In 2005, a record number of hurricanes formed in the Atlantic, many striking the United States with devastating effects. First there was Katrina, then Rita, then Wilma -- three storms that ripped through towns, destroyed homes and killed hundreds. In 2006, most meteorologists expected another active year, but we had a much quieter season. Now -- a new discovery may boost the accuracy of the forecasts.

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Dust Storms & Hurricanes

Bee Gone!

GREENBELT, M.D. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Don’t be afraid of the buzz of a bee. If it wasn’t for bees, many fruits and vegetables we enjoy wouldn’t exist. They are vital for pollination of plants, but lately, they’ve been disappearing by the billions, possibly putting food supplies at risk.

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Bee Gone!

Pest Control Au’ Naturale

WOOSTER, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Fruits and veggies are good for us, but the chemical pesticides they're sprayed with are not. Now, scientists are looking at ways to use the food chain to naturally battle bugs.

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Pest Control Au’ Naturale

Preventing Summer Heat Deaths

Summer heat kills more people than tornadoes, floods, hurricanes and lightning combined. Now new technology may help save lives.

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Preventing Summer Heat Deaths

Preparing For Disaster

Almost everyone lives where a flood, tornado or other natural disaster can strike but are you prepared? Simple tips to make sure you're covered.

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Preparing For Disaster

Can Co2 Be A Good Thing?

Pollution may have a positive effect on some parts of our environment. It's helping trees and plants grow faster.

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Can Co2 Be A Good Thing?

Tracking Global Carbon

A pollution alert -- carbon is increasing three times faster than it was 50 years ago. We'll show you how it affects the air we breathe.

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Tracking Global Carbon

The Right Mix of Trees

SYRACUSE, N.Y., (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Global warming is a highly debated political issue these days. Many people wonder what one person can do to help. Planting trees can play a powerful role in cleaning up the local environment, but they're disappearing from cities across America.

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The Right Mix of Trees

What's In Our Air?

BOULDER, Colo., (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Scientists at NOAA confirmed pollution controls put in place 10 years ago are impacting us today. Now, the scientists say, with certainty, the "Clean Air Act" regulations that went into effect in 1999 are working today.

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What's In Our Air?

Balloons Tracking Storms and Saving Lives

DENVER (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When hurricanes threaten, time is critical in making forecasts to save lives and property. When a hurricane strikes, forecasters need all the help they can get to predict just how bad it'll be. And scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have taken another step in better predicting how strong a hurricane will be and where it will strike.

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Balloons Tracking Storms and Saving Lives

Cleaning up CO2

ATHENS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Global warming's effects can be seen worldwide, and many experts believe it's only going to get worse! In fact, America is by far the largest contributor to global warming than any other country -- releasing a quarter of the world's carbon dioxide -- the primary cause of global warming. But now engineers have found a natural way to eliminate one of the worst contributors to our environment's decay.

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Cleaning up CO2

El Niño's Wicked Weather

PASADENA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Drenching rain ... Deadly tornadoes ... Wicked ice storms. 1998's El Niño was a huge force. So when El Niño surfaced again this winter, NASA climatologists and oceanographers jumped on his trail.

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El Niño's Wicked Weather

The Secret Lives of Snowflakes

GREENBELT, Md. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When a fresh batch of snow falls, it's not long before the fun starts! Now, add a little more fun by catching snow. It's an easy way to help planetary scientists collect and identify snowflakes for the new Global Snowflake Network.

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The Secret Lives of Snowflakes

Ranking Winter Storms

CAMP SPRINGS, Md. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When a winter storm hits, so do delays and headaches. Do you stockpile candles and canned goods or prepare the ice scraper and expect a difficult drive to work tomorrow?

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Ranking Winter Storms

Mission for NASA

TIMNATH, Colo. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- For millennia, man has studied clouds from the ground looking up. Today, satellites orbit earth, sending back a cross section of cloud information from the inside out...

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Mission for NASA

Heads up on Severe Weather

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's a sign of trouble. Thunderstorms mixed with air travel usually means delays, headaches and frustrated passengers. Flying from Atlanta to New York, the weather can change fast when you're flying at speeds up to 500 mph. Even huge airplanes are no match for the power of a thunderstorm.

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Heads up on Severe Weather

Thunder+Snow=Thundersnow

NORMAN, Okla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Thunder, lightning and snow?!? These are three things you usually never see together! It’s called thundersnow, a combination of thunder and lightning during a snowstorm -- kind of like shaking a snow-globe and adding lightning.

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Thunder+Snow=Thundersnow

Aerosols and Pollution

GREENBELT, Md. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- While riding his bike Yoram Kaufman was struck and killed by an SUV. He was a prominent, atmospheric scientist.

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Aerosols and Pollution

Mysteries of Thunderstorms

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There's no mistaking the billowing clouds, the noise, the rain, and the lightning of a thunderstorm. But why do some dark and ominous clouds form into huge masses of rain and lightning while others just pass us by?

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Mysteries of Thunderstorms

Scientist Profile: Young Hurricane Expert

FT. COLLINS, Colo. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- One of the country's leading hurricane experts is stepping down after three decades of forecasting. Meteorologist Bill Gray, Ph.D., at Colorado State University has passed the torch to a man whose young age and accomplishments may surprise you.

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Scientist Profile: Young Hurricane Expert

Predicting Major Weather Disasters

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes ... Nature's fickle, and devastating forces are sometimes a surprise. But scientists are not waiting for the next big one. Another hurricane season is here, and while we hold our breath hoping for a less-destructive season than last year, scientists are stepping up to the challenge of looking at how the United States will stand up to all types of natural disasters.

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Predicting Major Weather Disasters

Summer Forecast: La Niña

CAMP SPRINGS, Md. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Batten down the hatches! Forecasters are warning of another powerful hurricane season.

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Summer Forecast: La Niña

Sounds From the Sea

SEATTLE (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- What do boats, whales and rainfall sound like from underneath the surface of the sea? How does it affect everything that lives down there?

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Sounds From the Sea

Derecho

NORMAN, Okla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A derecho is a weather term meteorologists admit most people don't know about. But in this past year of unpredictable weather, it's worth learning about.

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Derecho
Predicting the Weather

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Do you bring your umbrella? Is severe weather headed your way? Where will the storm hit? These questions are answered by meteorologists every day. Their accuracy can not only help plan your weekend picnic, but can save lives, too. But how accurate are they? Weather forecasters and meteorologists are using more advanced technology than ever before to know when and where severe weather will strike.

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Predicting the Weather: Getting It Right!

Built on Shaky Ground

SAN FRANCISCO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- It's an unusual event ... A meeting of art and science. But it can make for a "shaky" learning experience, especially when it comes to earthquakes.

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Built on Shaky Ground

Tulips! Tulips! Tulips!

HILLEGOM, The Netherlands (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- When you think of Holland, you probably think of tulips. They're bright, bold and beautiful! Learn what it takes to grow tulips like these, but do you ever wonder how these unique flowers are grown? We traveled all the way to the tulip capital of the world to find out.

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Tulips! Tulips! Tulips!

New Tornado Scale

NORMAN, Okla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Until now, the damage of an F5 tornado in Oklahoma was rated the same as if it struck Ohio. But now the National Weather Service is updating a standard tornado scale to reflect consistency in reporting storms.

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New Tornado Scale

Hurricanes: Predicting 2006

MIAMI, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Last year, a record three Category 5 hurricanes hit the United States, leaving 1,300 Americans dead and millions homeless. Researchers just announced that we're in store for another rough storm season. But using new tools, meteorologists can now tell how many storms will occur and how bad they will be.

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Hurricanes: Predicting 2006
Hurricanes: Inside the Storm

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Warnings say stay away, but why are airplanes flying toward hurricanes? Preparations are underway for the 2006 hurricane season. Researchers say we're in the middle of a rough cycle, meaning we could be in store for more strong storms this season.

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Hurricanes: Inside the Storm

Real-Time Quake Detection

SAN DIEGO (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- The first few hours following a major earthquake are critical for seismologists, rescuers and people living in the quake zone. Now, researchers can estimate where a quake made its biggest impact within 30 minutes after a big earthquake.

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Real-Time Quake Detection
Forest Robot Fleet

LOS ANGELES (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- More than 80-percent of the earth's natural forests have been destroyed, and research shows 45 percent of lakes are too polluted to be safe for drinking, fishing or even swimming. We all know our environment is changing, but there's still a lot to learn. With new technology, we may soon have a clearer picture of exactly what's happening.

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Forest Robot Fleet

Harder Rain, More Snow

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- If you don't like the weather now ... Just wait, huge changes could be in store. Some scientists predict severe weather events will be even more extreme over the next few decades -- more snow, harder rain, and hotter heat waves.

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Harder Rain, More Snow

Forecasting Aftershocks

PASADENA, Calif. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Earthquakes are unpredictable, but one thing seismologists know for certain is the occurrence of one earthquake makes another one more likely. The unexpected and violent nature of earthquakes keeps a lot of people on edge, but now, they have a new tool for figuring out when and where aftershocks could occur.

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Forecasting Aftershocks

Danger in Your Backyard

DULLES, Va. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- There could be dangerous chemicals lurking in your own backyard, putting you and your family at risk. The harmful chemical arsenic, once used to treat lumber, and now primarily used in pesticides, can make its way into the ground and linger for decades, turning clean soil into tainted dirt. Now, scientists are getting down and dirty with a new way to clean it up.

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Danger in Your Backyard

Saving Butterflies

LAWRENCE, Kan. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- We've seen them and probably taken them for granted. But if we don't do something now to save the monarch butterfly, they could disappear. Now scientists have a new plan to help put these butterflies back on the map.

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Saving Butterflies

Fog Cleans Air Pollution

FORT COLLINS, Colo. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- A dreary, foggy morning may wreak havoc on your morning commute. But now, scientists reveal that not all thick, foggy air is bad. Some of it may be helping to cleanse the atmosphere by absorbing polluting airborne particles.

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Fog Cleans Air Pollution

Hurricanes Spawn Tornadoes

(Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Hurricane season officially started in June, and now forecasters from the NOAA Storm Prediction Center say once a hurricane makes landfall, the storm often weakens and can lead to tornadoes, even thousands of miles away.

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Hurricane Spawn Tornadoes

Heat and Health Alert

(Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- We think of summer as carefree and fun, but for many people, super-hot weather can be more than uncomfortable. It can be dangerous, especially for children and the elderly. Now scientists have a new way to warn us when the mercury becomes menacing.

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Heat and Health Alert

North American Monsoon

BOULDER, Colo. (Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Summertime brings the right mix of conditions for thunderstorms, but pinning down their exact location makes forecasting summer weather unpredictable. A group of researchers is trying to change that, and the results could have a huge impact on our economy.

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North American Monsoon

Quake Network

(Ivanhoe Broadcast News) -- Last December's tsunami was triggered by an earthquake in the Indian Ocean. Experts say the United States has a 1 in 5 chance of a cataclysmic earthquake off the west coast in the next 50 years, one that could trigger our own tsunami. This realization put the scientific community to work, as it now examines the vast amount of information collected from a network of seismic monitors.

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Quake Network
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