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Men's Health Channel
Reported February 20, 2014

Breast Cancer Genes: a Guy Problem?

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Famous actress Angelina Jolie made headlines when she announced she was having a preventive mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA mutation. It was a story that caught the attention of women everywhere, but women aren’t the only ones who are affected by these genes.

A year ago, Josh Newby quit his successful job at a dot-com company to care for his mom Theresa.

“It’s the greatest decision I ever made,” Josh told Ivanhoe.

Theresa had stage IV breast cancer and was in hospice until she passed away.

When she was diagnosed, she tested positive for a BRCA gene mutation. She wanted Josh to get the blood test too. His result was also positive.  

“I thought, wow, I have this gene. I got to take my life a little more seriously,” Josh said.

Genetic counselor Khateriaa Pyrtel says many don’t realize men can pass the faulty gene to their daughters and women can pass it on to their sons.

“I do find that it’s often like they’re not even thinking about the men in the families. We get the same information from our mothers that we do from our fathers in terms of our genes,” Khateriaa Pyrtel, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic Counselor, Washington University School of Medicine, told Ivanhoe.

Men and women with a BRCA mutation have a 50 percent chance of passing it on. Women with the mutation are up to seven times more likely to develop breast cancer, and at least ten times more likely to develop ovarian cancer.

The risk is much lower for men. Only 2,240 cases of male breast cancers are diagnosed each year. However, men with the mutation are at a higher risk for other types of cancers including prostate, stomach, pancreatic, and melanoma.

The rule of thumb is that men should consider testing if they have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Josh was glad he did.

“I do hope to have children someday, and that’s very powerful information to have,” Josh said.

There’s currently no standardized guidelines recommended for men, but men from families with a strong history of breast and ovarian cancer should consider getting tested.

To learn more about Josh’s foundation, log onto www.metastaticfoundation.org.

For additional research on this article, click here.

Sign up for a free weekly e-mail on Medical Breakthroughs called First to Know by clicking here.

If this story or any other Ivanhoe story has impacted your life or prompted you or someone you know to seek or change treatments, please let us know by contacting Emily Farr at efarr@ivanhoe.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Khateriaa Pyrtel, MS, CGC
Certified Genetic Councilor
Washington University School of Medicine
pyrtelk@wudosis.wustl.edu
 

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