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Asthma & Allergies Channel
Reported December 26, 2013

Asthma App: Paying Kids to Breathe Easier

CHICAGO, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) --Asthma triggers more school absences and hospitalizations than any other chronic condition in this country, affecting more than seven million children. Quick release medications can help kids control symptoms, if they remember to take them. Now, researchers are developing a new app that could help.

Mikah Allen loves playing basketball.

“When I try to keep up with the other kids, play with them, play how they play, it gets hard because they don’t have what I got,” Mikah Allen told Ivanhoe.

Mikah‘s chronic uncontrolled asthma needs daily meds. If he forgets, exercise can trigger an attack.

“It’s like somebody just coming up to you and just choking you,” Allen said.

Every year asthma accounts for 13 million missed school days and one quarter of all emergency room visits. It’s something Dr. Giselle Mosnaim knows too well.

“If they would take their medications, these could be avoidable,” Dr. Giselle Mosnaim, Allergist and Immunologist, Rush University Medical Center, told Ivanhoe.

“It just slips my mind sometimes,” Allen said.

Now, researchers are giving high risk teens something they’ll never forget, a smart phone loaded with a special app that turns taking your medicine into a game.

Each time a kid uses their daily controller medication inhaler, they can play to earn rewards on Google Play.

“So, they get 50 cents that they can spend on music, apps, TV shows, and movies,” Dr. Mosnaim said.

Teens can earn up to a dollar a day for Google Play rewards. Meanwhile, researchers are tracking when and where kids take their meds.

“We can also intervene at that moment. If we see they’re missing doses of medicine, we send them a message,” Dr. Mosnaim said.

New technology that’s helping Mikah and his mom breathe easier.

“It’s something else other than me yelling, or saying, ‘did you take your pump?’” Jennifer Nailer, Mikah’s mother, told Ivanhoe.

The study is funded by the national institutes of health and is still in clinical trials. According to Dr. Mosnaim, there are lots of asthma apps out there, but very few of them have this kind of clinical trial data behind them.

Researchers believe once kids start feeling better after following their daily controller medication regimen with the new app, they’ll be more likely to continue using their daily controller medication inhalers and stay out of the emergency room and hospital.

For additional research on this article, click here.

Sign up for a free weekly e-mail on Medical Breakthroughs called First to Know by clicking here.

If this story or any other Ivanhoe story has impacted your life or prompted you or someone you know to seek or change treatments, please let us know by contacting Emily Farr at efarr@ivanhoe.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Dr. Giselle Mosnaim
Allergist and Immunologist
Rush University Medical Center
312-942-3133

 

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