Medical Breakthroughs Reported by Ivanhoe.com. Click here to go to the homepage.
Be the First to Know. Click here to subscribe FREE!
Search Reports: Use quotation marks around your multi-word search terms in the box below to perform search of Ivanhoe.com.
Advances in health and medicine.Use " marks around search terms
 
What's New
News Flash
Discussion
healthchannelnews
  Alternative Health
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Breast Cancer
Cancer
Cardiovascular Health
Children's Health
Dental Health
Diabetes
Fertility & Pregnancy
Men's Health
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Nutrition & Wellness
Orthopedics
Pet Health
Robotics
Seniors' Health
Sports Medicine
Vision
Women's Health
Advances in health and medicine.
Click here to sign up for Medical Alerts!
Click below to access other news from Ivanhoe Broadcast News.
  Click here to get Ivanhoe's Medical Headline RSS feed Click here to listen to Ivanhoe's Medical Podcasts
Useful Links
Play It Again, Please
E-Mail a Friend
Order Books Online
Inside Science
Smart Woman
Advances in health and medicine.
Smart Woman Home
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Click here to read the story
Smart Woman Home
Advances in health and medicine.
Click below to learn about Ivanhoe.
  Awards
About Us
Contact Us
Employment
Feedback
Ivanhoe FAQ
Our TV Partners
Travel Calendar
Advances in health and medicine.
Ivanhoe celebrates 20 years of medical news reporting reaching nearly 80 million TV households each week. Click here to learn more...
Advances in health and medicine.
Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
Publisher/President
Advances in health and medicine.
Advertisement
General Health Channel
Reported July 19, 2011

New Drug May Raise ‘Good’ Cholesterol and Control Diabetes

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A medicine designed to improve levels of "good" cholesterol may also help control blood sugar in people with diabetes who are taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, according to this study.

The drug, Torcetrapib is a cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, a type of drug that increases levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs, or "good" cholesterol).

The study found that 6,661 people with type 2 diabetes – also known as "adult-onset" diabetes – showed improved blood sugar control when taking torcetrapib along with a statin medication that reduces low-density lipoproteins (LDLs or "bad" cholesterol). Subjects who took a statin and a placebo did not see such improvements.

"The possibility that CETP inhibitor drugs may not only reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, but may also improve the control of blood sugar in people with diabetes, is an exciting prospect that may translate into real health benefits for people with diabetes," the study's lead author, Philip Barter, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., a professor of medicine and director of the Heart Research Institute at the University of Sydney in Australia, was quoted as saying.

While the experimental drug was not as effective in taming diabetes as drugs that are commonly used for that purpose, it did reduce the adverse impact on blood sugar commonly seen with statin use. "Inhibition of CETP has the potential to prevent a worsening of diabetic control that often occurs in people taking statin drugs,” Barter said.
The clinical trial called ILLUMINATE (Investigation of Lipid Level Management to Understand its Impact in Atherosclerotic Events) involved more than 15,000 people ages 45 to 75. They all had a history of heart attack, stroke, chest pain, peripheral vascular disease or cardiac revascularization (angioplasty or bypass). All were taking medicine to help control their diabetes.

Two other CETP inhibitors that scientists say do not cause the adverse effects – dalcetrapib and anacetrapib – are in the government's drug approval pipeline.

After three months of treatment, those given both drugs had fasting blood sugar 0.34 millimoles per liter lower than in the group receiving just the statin.

Fasting insulin was 11.7 microunits per milliter lower in the group receiving both drugs, and insulin resistance was also improved.

After six months, average levels of blood sugar control over a months-long period were lower in the group receiving both drugs (7.06 percent) versus the group receiving just the statin (7.29 percent).

Use of the CETP inhibitor also improved glucose and insulin measurements in study participants without diabetes, although not as much. In addition, the study found that HDL levels had risen 66.8 percent after a year of taking torcetrapib and the statin, compared with minimal change in the other group. It's unclear whether torcetrapib's impact on HDL may account in part for the improvement in diabetic control, the scientists noted.

SOURCE: Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, published online July 18, 2011


 

 

Related Articles in Latest Medical News:

[ Back to General Health Channel Home ]

MEDICAL ALERT!
Stay up to date on General Health. We can notify you every time there is a medical breakthrough. Click here to sign up.
EDITOR'S CHOICE
Most Recent Videos
Your Baby DVD
What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know

Happier Woman DVD
25 ways to reduce stress

Forever Young DVD
25 ways to lose 10 years

Feel Good Again DVD
25 ways to STOP THE PAIN

If a treatment you read about here helps you, let us know...Click here!!

Follow Us On:

Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Twitter page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's Facebook page Click here to go to Ivanhoe's YouTube page

Scale
Do you know if you are height-weight proportional?

Find out your Body Mass Index (BMI).

Click Here

Advertisement

How safe are your dietary supplements?

Click here to find out with the FDA's list of supplements and drug interactions.

Home | What's New | News Flash | Search/Latest Medical News | E-Mail Medical Alerts!
Ivanhoe FAQ | Privacy Policy | Our TV Partners | Awards | Useful Links | Play It Again, Please
RSS Feeds | Advertising/Sponsorships | Content Syndication | Reprints

Advances in health and medicine.
webdoctor@ivanhoe.com
Copyright © 2014 Ivanhoe Broadcast News, Inc.
2745 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(407) 740-0789

P.O. Box 865
Orlando, Florida 32802

Premium Content in Latest Medical News Denotes Premium Content in Latest Medical News